French Citizens come together as Notre Dame burns down

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French Citizens come together as Notre Dame burns down

Nadia Ansari, Editor-In-Chief

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The Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France is one of the most beautiful and groundbreaking pieces of 18th century religious architecture ever to be found. Built as well with original Peruvian limestone to show the church’s rich french history with the unknown amount of lumber in the middle. Little did anybody know, that the building’s layout might pay the price.

Last Monday, a fire occurred in the attic of the cathedral, where many officials believe electrical wiring was the main culprit for the blaze to occur. The whole cathedral was destroyed after the fire, and president Emmanuel Macron has vowed to repair the sacred  monument, which should take approximately five years to repair. Thousands of French citizens are taking action and funding estimated costs of $6.8 million dollars, donations hours after the fire took place included people such as french philanthropists and charities. Including this, over one million dollars in profits were raised in the span of a day to support the rebuild of this great cathedral!

I had the opportunity to visit Notre Dame about  five months ago myself and let me just say, all of the information about Notre Dame being “sacred” and “something never to get rid of” is absolutely true. The buildings architecture is absolutely breathtaking, and not only that, the 18th century artwork, including pieces from the French revolution which was a turning point for the church.  Attending a mass in this church is amazing as well, as you tend to feel one with yourself. Which also can explain the worldwide mourning when the building went down. To my fellow readers, if you get the opportunity to travel to France, or anywhere, please take it. This fire reminds all of us that major historical pieces of history can be destroyed in a heartbeat, so don’t ever lose the opportunity to see something that could be gone soon.

 

Here is Notre Dame Cathedral when I visited on December 28th, 2018

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